Part of Angola's Dark History to be Displayed at Smithsonian
Posted on 7/14/2013 6:00:00 PM.
A part of Angola State Prison's darker history will soon be on display at the Smithsonian Institute in Washington DC. Warden Burl Cain says an old guard tower will become part of the new National Museum of African American History. He says the tower was used by armed inmate guards from the 1930's until the  1970's.
The guard tower will eventually be moved to DC, where it will be incorporated into the new museum. Cain says no one is proud of the brutal past that the tower represents.
The Louisiana State Prison's nickname, "Angola", started as a reference to the African nation, from which many slaves were brought to the Gulf south. The prison's older history is one of cruelty, slavery and mass incarceration of blacks. Cain says the Smithsonian's request for the tower is an honor. He says it will be restored, then a building will be built around it at the new museum in DC; slated to open in late 2015.
Angola, Burl Cain, Smithsonian



Provided by ABC News
 
 

Monsanto is the Title Sponsor
of the Louisiana Agriculture
Hall of Distinction.



Copyright © 2013. All rights reserved | Privacy Policy


This site powered by PromoSuite Interactive